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Wanna Break Up? Go on Vacation, Study Says.

Lots of couples view a romantic vacation as a way to reconnect and perhaps experience some intimacy that may be difficult to come by when they have a house full of kids.

DivorceBut a study released over the summer found that taking a romantic vacation together might doom your relationship.

One in ten couples is likely to break up, and 40 percent of couples are likely to argue at least once a day while vacationing together, according to a survey of 2,000 adults polled by Holiday Autos, a car rental comparison website. Of those involved in the study, 25 percent reported that there would be a dust-up within the first 24 hours.

Situations that were likely to cause a couple to scrap included spending too much time together, drinking too much, and having conversations about budgets and dining options, according to the Daily Mail.

Couples admitted that road trips were the most stressful, thanks to getting lost or backseat driving.

Holiday Autos didn’t just present the evidence of their study and then leave couples to duke it out among themselves. They used it as the springboard to launch a 24-hour Couples’ Counselor hotline that offered one-on-one advice by phone over the summer, according to the Daily Mail. The hotline closed in September.

Couples who have romantic winter getaways planned should not lose heart yet. There are other studies that show vacations are good for relationships.

A 2013 U.S. Travel Association study revealed that couples who traveled together had better sex lives, according to USA Today. Nearly two-thirds of couples surveyed said a weekend getaway was more likely to spark romance in their relationship than a gift.

In June, Slate writer Rebecca Schuman offered up her parents as a gleaming example of how vacationing together but traveling separately to get there could be the recipe to avoiding becoming the one in 10 couples whose relationship doesn’t outlive their vacation. Her entertaining column is worth the read, and she backs it up with evidence.

A 2014 study showed that “getting to, from and through a departing and arriving airport” is the No. 1 travel stressor in this country, ruining vacations and sometimes even relationships, Schuman wrote.

Here’s hoping your romantic getaways are happy and uneventful. But if they go south, we’re here to help.

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Family Attorney John N. Griffith, CFLS

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Family Attorney, Catie E. Young, ESQ.

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Family Attorney Amy J. Lass, Esq.

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