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Women, Education and Divorce

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA – There was a time when relationships involving wives with better educations and jobs than their husbands had a higher rate of divorce. Recent studies prove times are changing as these same relationships now exhibit a lower divorce rate.

More women are choosing to break from the stereotypical homemaker status by pursuing higher education levels in an effort to take equal part in supporting their families alongside their husbands.

In 2012, 21 percent of married women had less educated husbands—a threefold increase from 1960, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of Census data.

One might think women striving for equality at work and home would breed insecurities among male counterparts who have come to identify themselves as breadwinners, but it appears men are actually embracing the shift toward a more egalitarian household.

“In 1977, two-thirds of Americans saw the ideal family arrangement as having the husband as the breadwinner and wife as the homemaker,” according to a July press release issued by the Council on Contemporary Families. “Thirty-five years later, less than one-third held this belief.”

Men not only seem to accept women closing in on their breadwinner status, they might actually prefer it.

“Once upon a time it was commonplace for a divorce to be blamed on the insecurity created by a wife valuing her job and education,” says John Griffith, a divorce attorney in San Diego. “Today it seems men are more accepting of a little help when it comes to their family’s finances, even if it comes from a wife with a better job and education.”

This acceptance may be due in part to socioeconomic impact, since it takes men longer to work their way to an income level that can support a family, according to the New York Times. The added income from a working wife could ease financial strain, which is often cited as the cause for 50 percent of marriages that end in divorce.

Famous marriages involving bread-winning wives and their lucky husbands include Sarah Jessica Parker and Matthew Broderick, Kyra Sedgwick and Kevin Bacon, and Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban.

Although we couldn’t be happier to hear news of lowered divorce rates, it doesn’t change the fact that it happens and that it’s not always pretty. Dividing family, pets and property in divorce is tricky, but they are situations an attorney is trained to navigate. Call today if you need legal assistance with divorce, prenuptial agreements or just someone who can show you where to start.

 

Meet Your Dedicated San Diego Family Attorneys
Family Attorney John N. Griffith, CFLS
Family Attorney John N. Griffith, CFLS

Family Attorney, John N. Griffith, CFLS

John Griffith has practiced exclusively in the area of family law since 2009. John is a Certified Family Law Specialist certified as an expert in the area of family law by the California Board of Legal Specialization.

858-345-1720
john@gylfamilylaw.com

Family Attorney, Catie E. Young, ESQ.
Family Attorney, Catie E. Young, ESQ.

Family Attorney, Catie E. Young, ESQ.

San Diego family lawyer Catie Young has a wide range of litigation experience. She has worked in civil litigation. She has successfully represented clients in many areas of family law including child support, child custody, divorce and domestic violence. She has a unique approach to each child custody case, so clients of Griffith, Young & Lass tend to gravitate toward her in these cases.

858-345-1720
catie@gylfamilylaw.com

Family Attorney Amy J. Lass, Esq.
Family Attorney Amy J. Lass, Esq.

Family Attorney, Amy J. Lass, Esq.

Amy Lass was born in New York and raised in San Diego, California. Amy graduated from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo in 2003 with a B.S. in Economics with a concentration in Enterprise Accounting and went on to earn her law degree from Thomas Jefferson School of Law and graduated cum laude in 2006. Amy takes a practical and cost considerate approach to the process while striving to balance the emotional needs and objectives of her clients.

858-345-1720
amy@gylfamilylaw.com

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The Typical Divorce Process in California
Discovery of Assets & Obligations (1-3 months)
1 Complaint for Divorce Filed Start of litigation
2 Complaint is Served Varies, but usually shortly after the complaint is filed
3 Answer to Complaint Due 30 days from the date of service
4 Mediation Anytime, but usually after initial discovery
5 Temporary Hearing Usually early in the process
6 Late Case Evaluation / Judicial Hosted Settlement Conference Usually near the end of the case
7 Trial (If Needed) The goal is to settle, but if your case goes to trial, it could take months after the start of litigation.
We deliver results
I am beyond grateful for the entire staff at Griffith, Young, and Lass. I don't even call myself a client anymore, they are my friends that protected my family and fought with me, side by side.-Erik H., San Diego